A place to post pictures of what facility designs you would like for cycling. Includes road, paths and bicycle parking. I encourage other AC members to post here.

There is an alternative topic for cycling facility designs you do not like called 'How NOT To Design For Cyclists' at http://www.adelaidecyclists.com/group/lookforcyclists/forum/topics/...

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Exploding flower calms rat runners
Until last Sunday, the intersection of Fifth and Drayton streets in Bowden looked much like any other urban junction, with the usual local concerns about drivers speeding through a quiet neighbourhood with a school.
Then a large, brightly coloured, geometric 'exploding flower' sprang up on the road surface.
The permanent artwork is a collaboration between local residents, Hindmarsh Greening, school students, an artist and the Charles Sturt Council. It was inspired by similar projects in the US and organisers believe it is the first of its kind in Australia.
Co-ordinator Jacqui Hunter, a member of Hindmarsh Greening, said the idea for the Intersection Repair Project arose two years ago after a friend told her about an organisation in Portland, Oregon, called City Repair, which encourages people to “creatively transform” the places in which they live.
“It’s about reclaiming the area as a community”, she said of the Bowden project. “Letting everyone know that people are using the space as well as cars.”
Approval and funding for the project was secured from the City of Charles Sturt, and artist Helen Crawford was employed to work on the design of the intersection artwork with Year 6 and 7 students at the Immaculate Heart of Mary school. They came up with a bold geometric and spiral pattern in orange, pink, green and blue.
The intersection was closed to traffic on Sunday while a team of about 50, including students, painted the design on the road.
“It’s been described as an exploding flower with tendrils – we hope to be able to eventually take tendrils up the stobie poles”, Ms Hunter said.
“The aim is that it will have the effect of calming traffic. The road is narrow and people still think they can whiz along … they just use it as a rat race.
“We have noted a change immediately.”
Bowden is one of several inner-northern suburbs that have undergone a gentrification in recent years, with some locals now cheekily referring to it as 'Lower North Adelaide'.
Ms Hunter said the intersection project encouraged residents to work together to reclaim the streets, rather than being afraid of them. Participants also met neighbours they didn’t previously know.
She said Charles Sturt Council didn’t hesitate to support their endeavours.
“Changing and doing new things is a bit hard for a lot of councils so we were impressed by their leap of faith. Hopefully this will set a precedent for other areas to follow.”

Suzie Keen
Published in Prospect Indaily on 2-Jun-2011 on page 1.
http://www.prospectindaily.com.au/?iid=48931&sr=0#folio=001

Riley Kerb – a yellow small profile that can be used to separate bicycle and travel lanes.

Photo at http://www.tcaaustralia.com.au/riley.html where this text comes from.

Riley Kerb. The ultimate traffic calming solution for safer cycling

Features

  • 2m long with transition at each end.

  • Rumble device in the vehicle lane to alert drivers they are crossing into a cycle lane

  • Yellow recycled rubber with built in reflectors

  • Can be placed with 100mm gaps to allow for water to flow through

  • A typical installation could be 2m of Riley Kerb with a 1m gap to allow cyclists to enter and exit the cycle lane

  • The cycle lane has a lip on the edge down to as low as 3mm to prevent the cyclist from being dislodged from their bike

  • Offers protection for cyclists

  • Contours to road surface and curves

  • Approaches to pedestrian crossings, particularly around school zones

  • Locations where the pavement size increases or decreases

  • On cycle paths at intersections to alert cyclists they are approaching a hazard


Ideally suited to

  • Squeeze points at intersections and roundabouts

  • School zones - entry and exit points for cyclists

  • Approaches to pedestrian crossings, particularly around school zones

  • Locations where the pavement size increases or decreases

  • On cycle paths at intersections to alert cyclists they are approaching a hazard

See also http://www.tcaaustralia.com.au/kerb.html and http://www.tcaaustralia.com.au/id31.html

The Traffic Calming Australia website also contains info on speed cushions, speed humps, separation kerbs, roundabouts, rubber kerbs, wheel stops and RPMs.

Cycling infrastructure
The City of Melbourne has been exploring better ways to ensure all road users can share our roads safely. The following cycling infrastructure has recently been implemented by the City of Melbourne:
Separated bike lanes
New bicycle lanes are currently being installed in Albert Street, East Melbourne between Gisborne and Hoddle streets, in order to help improve safety for all road users by separating motorists, pedestrians and cyclists.
Very like the separated bike lanes which were installed in Swanston Street in 2007, the Albert Street bike lanes have a few differences.
These bike lanes will incorporate a smaller barrier between cars and the bike lane. The barrier will not be raised as it is in Swanston Street. Instead the barrier will be marked with striped line-marking and will feature a ‘rumble strip’ so car drivers know when they are straying into the bike lane.
http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/ParksandActivities/ActiveMelbourne/...

Includes picture, or view via www.nearmap.com or google equivalent.

Vibraline and similar products
There are several versions of vibrating lines installed on roads. These give drivers warnings (visual, sensory / vibrating and audible) if they out of their travel lane, or towards the road shoulder, or into a bicycle lane. There are several colours (white or yellow) and profiles (see websites).


Vibraline http://www.prismogroup.com/products/road-markings/vibraline/index.html
and http://www.prismogroup.com/products/index.html

Briteline http://www.brite-line.com/products/profiled.html and http://www.brite-line.com/assets/media/products/ThermoProfile.pdf

http://202.6.169.23/publish/onemotoring/en/on_the_roads/road_safety...

The photo on the front of this manual includes one vibraline design (closest to the parked vehicles).

Vibraline Installed
Showing green-coloured bicycle lane and white vibraline to separate bicycle and travel lanes.


Peel Street, near Franklin Street, in suburb of Melbourne

Peel Street, near Franklin Street, in suburb of Melbourne

Albert Street, in suburb of East Melbourne

Vibraline for drivers in country SA. Taken by Rob, AC member.

A sample of better cycling facilities in City of Melbourne, Victoria
Gleaned from research knowledge, online aerial maps and street directory. If you live in Melbourne and see an error, please contact me. I would like to add info from the City of Yarra. Do you know of a facility worthy of adding?

Kerbside running bike lane
1. Albert Street, from Gisborne Street to Powlett Street, in suburb of East Melbourne
2. Swanston Street, from Faraday Street to Franklin Street, in suburbs of Carlton and Melbourne

Buffer strip to separate bicycle and travel lanes, using vibraline
1. Albert Street, from Gisborne Street to Powlett Street, in suburb of East Melbourne
2. Peel Street near Franklin Street, in suburb of Melbourne

Buffer strip to separate bicycle and travel lanes, using parallel white painted lines, some with chevron marking
1. Abbotsford Street, from Adderley Street to Flemington Road, in suburbs of North Melbourne and West Melbourne
2. Barkly Street, from Faraday Street to Swanston Street, in suburb of Carlton
3. Broadway, from Dennis Street to Strathmerton Street / Boldrewood Parade, in suburb of Reservoir
4. Faraday Street, from Canning Street to Swanston Street, Cin suburb of Carlton
5. Peel Street, from Franklin Street to A'Beckett Street, in suburb of Melbourne
6. Queensberry Street, from Laurens Street to Rathdowne Street, in suburbs of Carlton and North Melbourne
7. Rathdowne Street, North Melbourne, from Princess Street to Park Street, in suburb of North Melbourne
8. Somerville Road, from Fairlie Street to Garmon Street, in suburb of Yarraville

Green-coloured bicycle lane near intersection, in conjunction with green-coloured stand-ahead bike-box
1. Abbotsford Street, from Adderley Street to Flemington Road, in suburbs of North Melbourne and West Melbourne
2. Albert Street, from Gisborne Street to Powlett Street, in suburb of East Melbourne
3. Elgin Street, from Nicholson Street to Lygon Street, in suburb of Carlton
4. Elgin Street, from Swanston Street to Nicholson Street, in suburbs of Carlton, East Melbourne and Melbourne
5. Flemington Road, from at least Abbotsford Street, in suburb of North Melbourne
6. Flemington Road, near Royal Children's Hospital (close to Abbotsford Street), in suburb of North Melbourne
7. Gisborne Street, from Cathedral Place to Victoria Parade, in suburb of East Melbourne
8. Pigdon Street, from Nicholson Street to Bowen Crescent, in suburb of North Carlton
9. Queensberry Street, from Laurens Street to Rathdowne Street, in suburbs of Carlton and North Melbourne
10. Rathdowne Street (and La Trobe Street), from Victoria Street / Parade to at least Davis Street, in suburbs of Carlton and North Carlton
11. Rathdowne Street, from Princess Street to Park Street, in suburb of North Melbourne
12. Swanston Street, from Faraday Street to Franklin Street, in suburbs of Carlton and Melbourne

Green-coloured bicycle lane across intersection
1. Canning Street and Curtain Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton North
2. Canning Street and Davis Street intersection, Carlton North
3. Canning Street and Fenwick Street intersection, Carlton North
4. Canning Street and Kay Street intersection, Carlton North
5. Canning Street and Lee Street intersection, Carlton North
6. Flemington Road and entry to Royal Children's Hospital (close to Abbotsford Street), in suburb of North Melbourne
7. Gisborne Street and Cathedral Place, in suburb of East Melbourne
8. MacArthur Street and St Andrews Place, in suburb of East Melbourne
9. Peel Street and Bedford Street intersection, in suburb of Melbourne
10. Queensberry Street and Barkly Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
11. Queensberry Street and Lothian Street intersection, in suburb of North Melbourne
12. Queensberry Street and Munster Terrace intersection, in suburb of North Melbourne
13. Queensberry Street and Stawell Street intersection, in suburb of North Melbourne
14. Rathdowne Street and Barkly Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
15. Rathdowne Street and Faraday Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
16. Rathdowne Street and MacArthur Place North intersection, in suburb of Carlton
17. Rathdowne Street and MacPherson Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton North
18. Rathdowne Street and Neill Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
19. Rathdowne Street and Palmerston Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
20. Rathdowne Street and Pelham Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
21. Swanston Street and Carlton Place, in suburb of Carlton
22. Swanston Street and Cornell Place, in suburb of Carlton
23. Swanston Street and Farraday Street, in suburb of Carlton
24. Swanston Street and Lincoln Place, in suburb of Carlton
25. Swanston Street and Lincoln Square South, in suburb of Carlton
26. Swanston Street and Lynch Street, in suburb of Carlton
27. Swanston Street and Pelham Street, in suburb of Carlton

Green-coloured turn-left bicycle lane
1. Elgin Street into Drummond Street, in suburb of Carlton

Roundabout with green-coloured bicycle lane
1. Canning Street and Barkly Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
2. Canning Street and Faraday Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton
3. Canning Street and Neill Street intersection, in suburb of Carlton

Kerbside Running Bicycle Lane Installed

Albert Street, in suburb of East Melbourne

Albert Street, in suburb of East Melbourne

Buffer strip to separate bicycle and travel lanes, using parallel white painted lines and chevrons

A freight route in North Melbourne


Somerville Road, from Fairlie Street to Garmon Street, in suburb of Yarraville


http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=getting-more-bicyc...
Oct-2009

Getting people out of cars and onto bicycles, a much more sustainable form of transportation, has long vexed environmentally conscious city planners. Although bike lanes painted on streets and automobile-free ‘greenways’ have increased ridership over the past few years, the share of people relying on bikes for transportation is still less than 2 percent, based on various studies. An emerging body of research suggests that a superior strategy to increase pedal pushing could be had by asking the perennial question: What do women want?

In the US, men’s cycling trips surpass women’s by at least 2:1. This ratio stands in marked contrast to cycling in European countries, where urban biking is a way of life and draws about as many women as men – sometimes more. In the Netherlands, where 27 percent of all trips are made by bike, 55 percent of all riders are women. In Germany 12 percent of all trips are on bikes, 49 percent of which are made by women.

“If you want to know if an urban environment supports cycling, you can forget about all the detailed ‘bikeability indexes’ – just measure the proportion of cyclists who are female”, says Jan Garrard, a senior lecturer at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and author of several studies on biking and gender differences.

Women are considered an ‘indicator species’ for bike-friendly cities for several reasons. First, studies across disciplines as disparate as criminology and child-rearing have shown that women are more averse to risk than men. In the cycling arena, that risk aversion translates into increased demand for safe bike infrastructure as a prerequisite for riding. Women also do most of the child care and household shopping, which means these bike routes need to be organised around practical urban destinations to make a difference.

“Despite our hope that gender roles do not exist, they still do,” says Jennifer Dill, a transportation and planning researcher at Portland State University. Addressing women’s concerns about safety and utility “will go a long way” toward increasing the number of people on two wheels, Dill explains.

So far few cities have taken on the challenge. In the US, most cycling facilities consist of on-street bike lanes, which require riding in vehicle-clogged traffic, notes John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University and longtime bike scholar. And when cities do install traffic-protected off-street bike paths, they are almost always along rivers and parks rather than along routes leading “to the supermarket, the school, the day care centre”, Pucher says.

Although researchers have long examined the bike infrastructure in Europe, they have only just started to do so for the US. In a study conducted last year, Dill examined the effect of different types of bike facilities on cycling. The project, which used GPS positioning to record individual cycling trips in Portland, compared the shortest route with the path cyclists actually took to their destination. Women were less likely than men to try on-street bike lanes and more likely to go out of their way to use ‘bike boulevards’, quiet residential streets with special traffic-calming features for bicycles. “Women diverted from the shortest routes more often”, Dill says.

Other data support those findings. In New York City, men are three times as likely to be cyclists as women. Yet a bicycle count found that an off-street bike path in Central Park had 44 percent female riders. “Within the same city you find huge deviations in terms of gender”, Pucher remarks.

The Bicentennial Bikeway in Brisbane, Qld, is a long wide two-lane bicycle path with pedestrian path along the Brisbane River. To view an image, go to www.nearmap.com and search for Tank Street, Brisbane, Queensland, then move towards left of screen and the Brisbane River.

http://www.cbdbug.org.au/projects/bicentennial-bikeway
Bicentennial Bikeway
Brisbane's inner Western arterial bikeway, connecting the Western Freeway bikeway at Toowong in to the CBD
The Bicentennial Bikeway is being upgraded in stages, from a generally 3.0-3.5 metre wide shared path to a generally 3.5 metre wide dedicated bike path with a separate 2.0 metre wide pedestrian path. Although this will be of great benefit cyclists in the long term, the construction will cause some inconvenience.

http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/traffic-transport/roads-infrastructu...
Bicentennial bikeway upgrade
The Bicentennial bikeway is Brisbane city’s busiest shared pathway and an important cycle and pedestrian link in the active transport network. Running along the Brisbane River and connecting the CBD to Toowong, each day it carries more than 4000 pedestrians and cyclists.
Brisbane City Council is progressively upgrading the Bicentennial bikeway. To minimise the impact of construction work on pathway users, this work is being completed in stages.
stage one - Cribb Street to Park Road, was completed in 2009
stage two - Lang Parade to Land Street, was completed in September 2010
stage three - Park Road to Lang Parade, has a detailed design prepared and Council plans to commence work on this stage in 2012/2013
stage four - Land Street to west of the Regatta Ferry Terminal, is under investigation with plans to upgrade this section of the pathway in 2012/2013
In addition, Council upgraded the Bicentennial bikeway west and east of the Hale Street bridge in 2011.

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