Bike lanes so narrow that even the symbol doesn't fit.

Is there an Australian Standard for the minimum width of a bicycle lane? I've noticed a lot around Adelaide that the bike symbol won't even fit into. I know there's a very narrow one near Henley Square. How about sharing photos of them? Here's a couple to start:

Edward St, Melrose Park.

King George Ave, North Brighton.

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Henry, I have a long answer for you.
Search the web if you want to download these three documents. See the diagrams, tables and full text.

Pavement Marking Manual, published by DPTI in Feb-2018, pdf page 29
Bicycle and pedestrian pavement symbols (cont)
Bicycle pavement symbol Road X = 65mm Y = 1800mm, Path X = 28mm Y = 800mm
[diagram]
For bicycle lanes less than 1.2 m, bicycle pavement symbol may be reduced proportionally. As an alternative parts of the bicycle pavement symbol may be omitted to ensure the symbol fits within the lane (refer to right diagram).
[diagram]

My note: Above refers to bike lane width less than 1.2 m. According to Austroads, bike lane width must be at least 1.2 m wide, and preferably 1.5 m or wider.

Also consider South Australia Road Traffic (Road Rules—Ancillary and Miscellaneous Provisions) Regulations 2014 under the Road Traffic Act 1961

11A—Keeping a safe lateral distance when passing bicycle rider
(My abbreviation
Where speed limit is 60 km/h or less, overtaking vehicle to leave at least 1 m from cyclist
Where speed limit is more than 60 km/h, overtaking vehicle to leave at least 1.5 m from cyclist)

Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides, by Austroads, 3rd edition published Jun-2017

pdf pages 33 & 34
3.2 Space to Ride and Figure 3.1: Cyclist Envelope
operating width of bicycle + rider 1.00 metres
See also Figure 3.2: Road Clearances 

pdf pages 40–43
Table 4.2: Clearance to the cyclist envelope from an adjacent truck (below as words rather than table)
Speed limit 60 km/h, desirable clearance 1 m, preferred clearance 1.5 m
Speed limit 70 km/h, desirable clearance 1.5 m, preferred clearance 2 m
Speed limit 80 km/h, desirable clearance 1.5 m, preferred clearance 2 m
Speed limit 100 km/h, desirable clearance 2 m, preferred clearance 2.5 m
Speed limit 110 km/h, desirable clearance 2+ m, preferred clearance 2.5 m

pdf pages 40–44
The following factors should be the subject of careful assessment when choosing the lane or treatment widths ...
The demand for the adjoining general traffic lane is also an important issue in assessing the adequacy of bicycle lanes ...

Table 4.3 shows the minimum bicycle lane widths for urban roads posted at various speeds. It should be noted that urban roads with a posted speed greater than 80 km/h (e.g. 100 km/h) will usually be a freeway or expressway that carries a high volume of high speed traffic. In this case it is essential that cyclists are provided with facilities that comply with Safe System principles, namely physically separated bicycle lanes or paths that are protected by safety barriers, and grade separations or controlled crossings at interchanges.

Table 4.3: Exclusive bicycle lane dimensions in urban areas (below as words rather than table)
Speed limit 60 km/h, desirable lane width 1.5 m, acceptable range 1.2–2.5 m
Speed limit 80 km/h, desirable lane width 2.0 m, acceptable range 1.8–2.7 m
Speed limit 80 km/h, desirable lane width 2.5 m, acceptable range 2.0–3.0 m

My memory told me that Frome Road heading north past the University of Adelaide would be one.  But it just fits in ...

With the gutter including stormwater grate forming a significant cross-section of the 'bike lane'.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I,m of the understanding the gutter is not counted as part of the roadway. A bicycle lane is considered part of the roadway. However the gutter is counted as part of the bike lane. If I'm correct, this is just an avoidance by the relative authorities for providing crap bikelanes.

Re the photo – the cycling area narrows further near the Frome Rd intersection with Victoria Dr.

Michael, check the area as to whether it is marked as an official bike lane or just a cycling area. See ARR extract below.
Years ago I spoke to ACC about this cycling area (then not marked as an official bike lane).
Narrow space, many overtaking vehicles, and during peak times cars often parked for a few minutes to pick up passengers. Cars illegally parked considering the many bus stop zones and signs like ‘no standing’.
At the time, ACC said that the space did not meet Austroads requirements for a bike lane, especially near Victoria Dr. That there were no plans to change from cycling area to a bike lane. That the bus stop zones and signage reminded drivers not to stop in the cycling area.

South Australia Australian Road Rules under the Road Traffic Act 1961
Version: 1.9.2014 [not the most recent version but indicates a while since rules re marking of bike lanes changed in SA]
153—Bicycle lanes
...
(4) A bicycle lane is a marked lane, or the part of a marked lane—
(a) beginning at a bicycle lane sign applying to the lane, or a road marking comprising both a white bicycle symbol and the word "lane" painted in white;
and
(b) ending at the nearest of the following:
(i) an end bicycle lane sign applying to the lane, or a road marking comprising both a white bicycle symbol and the words "end lane" painted in white;
(ii) an intersection (unless the lane is at the unbroken side of the continuing road at a T-intersection or continued across the intersection by broken lines);
(iii) if the road ends at a dead end—the end of the road.

DPTI Cycling and Walking maps show that section of Frome Rd being a main road with a bike lane - they are regarding it as a bike lane.  That is crap of course, as it is nowhere near the standard (meeting only the 'Adelaide standard').

On Google Street View (images May 2018) I can't see any "Bicycle lane" sign north of North Terrace (going northbound). If there isn't one, then it's not a legal bicycle lane, as Heather suspects.

Again going by GSV, it starts out nice and wide, and narrows dramatically just before the next traffic lights (the ones for going into the old RAH). It never bothers me much because I can get a good speed going downhill anyway, but it's a dangerous situation for inexperienced riders, especially with the new school there.

I think this one on Seaview Rd, near Henley Square, must be for unicycles only.

Kristian, earlier I posted from
Cycling Aspects of Austroads Guides, by Austroads, 3rd edition published Jun-2017
Table 4.3 shows the minimum bicycle lane widths for urban roads posted at various speeds.
Note 3 with the table:
The width of the lane is normally measured from the face of the adjacent left side kerb. The width of road gutters/channels (comprising a different surface medium) should be less than 0.4 m where minimum dimensions are used. The figures in the table presume that surface conditions are to be of the highest standard. Where there are poor surface conditions (see AGRD06A (Austroads 2017c), Appendix B) over a section of road adjacent to the gutter, then the width of the exclusive bicycle lane should be measured from the outside edge of that section.

I also found online Austroads Glossary of Terms, published by Austroads in Aug-2015.
Roadway / Carriageway – Any one part of the width of a road devoted particularly to the use of vehicles, inclusive of shoulders and auxiliary lanes.
A Road or Road Reserve includes the Roadway / Carriageway, Footpath and Verge.
Some people mix up the terms Roadway and Road, although Kristian would not.

The Austroads Glossary of Terms does not include cycling area (familiar to SA cyclists) for an area marked with bike logos, but not fully marked as an official Bicycle Lane because it does not meet the guidelines. Think of the narrow space between a Traffic Lane and Parking Lane, within the dooring zone (also not in the glossary)

Thanks Heather. Still confusing as hell. No chance that 99% of people are going to know what is cycle lane and what is "cycle area". The average driver is going to see a bike symbol and think it's a bike lane and get annoyed when people aren't riding in it. 

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